>^..^<

Archive
Tag "comments"

I loved the Symposium 2 day – though it was hectic it was suddenly very obvious too me how different our course is to most other creative courses. Because the only thing that binds us is ‘digital’ we have ended up making more than 20 very different projects – I am very exited for the exhibition and seeing everything in one room!

I was quite happy that I managed to use so many of my findings from my research paper in the symposium video and I was overwhelmed by how positive the comments were. So, all in all  I think the symposium went very well – though being last is might also have had some influence ;)

Kiers, Jonathan and Harry recommended the Richard Dawkins Meme video - ironically enough I was in Cannes when it was shown at he New Directors Showcase but I had to attend a meeting and missed it live … I now wish I hadn’t… Here’s the link (if anyone is reading and doesn’t know it). Sadly, it might not be viral material but it is rather educational – and psychedelic.

Then I had some nice rations the pictures of lolcats I threw in the video to illustrate a point – which made me want to finish my personal project for the show but I’m afraid it’s to much work within the time I have left…

Luckily people also like the #ISEEFACESs#ISEELEGS project. This is important because I guess it will be a main piece of a sort.

The idea of getting people involved was also appreciated. Edward Kelly rightly pointed out that my main focus now should be on how I can engage people at the show – I will create a post in near future dedicated to this question!

Lionel thought I should exhibit some of the  #ISEEFACESs#ISEELEGS  work in selected prints. I think Jonathan has suggested this before and I’ve wanted to but I was afraid since I don’t own the work. We discussed that I might put the original participants name on the m instead an I really like that idea!

Lionel also had a good comment to the fact that I might end up editing the work on my website. He thought it wouldn’t be democratic and really I agree – but sadly it still might be necessary. Anyway, I think I will program it so I have the option and then  I might not use it in the end.

Thank you all on the course for your time and comments – AND thank you for showing your amazing projects!

 

Read More

Thanks to everyone on the course for your feedback on my MPR video. The session was very inspirational and cleared some things up for me.

First of all I am really glad people liked my #venusreborn experiment, I am planning to develop this further so it was great that you guys liked the project.

Comments

Some of your comments and questions were a bit challenging to my concept. And I thank you so much for that! You asked some really great and relevant questions. I like to start out by reflecting over these, after this I will post your suggestions and links.

I’d like to start by responding to Ben’s comment, because reflecting on it made me realise something very important about my project:

One thing that comes to me as i watch it is that i learn about your concept but i don’t feel like I know much about you as an artist maybe (that sounds way harsher than I mean it). I just mean all the references are social media peeps like Clay Shirkey.
Maybe that’s some of the point?
After all the whole thing is about co-curation.

I think Ben is right – with this project I am stepping out of the spotlight because I am trying to nail what is truly social. This means I need to step back a bit and let the people who interact with the piece finish the job for me. My job is to set the scene and let go a little bit so the project can live. For the record, I do have other references than social media people. like a lot of contemporary artists. But what I want to do with this project is to create something that will engage the audience and move them to participate in my project.

I have been worrying what the end result will be. Now I realise that the audience experience will come from participation, and probably not from viewing the finalized work (if it as Sneja says even should be finalised).

Sneja:

I learned a lot about Katrine’s concept but I still wish to no more about people’s motivations to participate?

Ola:

The point of what will drive people to want to participate, in my opinion will be based on the project, does it interest me? what do I get out of it?

This is really the big question. And this part scares me the most. I am trying to answer this by studying relevant literature and other social media art projects, as well as participating in them my self. Kiers felt that money is a motivational factor and I have studied cases like Aaron Koblin Sheep market where he payed people on Mechanical Turk to participate. This in my opinion is not truly social, so I agree with Edward Kelly who suggested that participation itself should be the reward. I don’t know if the project has to be limited as he suggest, many of the projects that I have studied have been open and people still participate. Though in my #venusreborn project this factor was probably a driver.

I agree with Sneja that I as the curator/director/artist can steer the project and therefore (hopefully) ensure the quality.

Kiers:

 I wonder if this is more about social art or the art of being social…

To be truthful, I don’t know if it’s one way or the other (but for what it’s worth I liked the thought so much that I put it in the headline of this post).

Kiers:

perhaps creativity in groups is less focused on a single aesthetic goal, and easier to focus on a perceived conceptual one.. perhaps..

Ben:

It almost makes me wonder whether it’d be worth looking at curatorial books? Are you the curator in this? This is an issue at the core of curatorial practice that seems relevant to your project to me.

Sneja:

I like the idea of curator as well … and I think that quality of the co-created artwork can only be assured if the artist remains the director

I agree completely with both Ben and Sneja on this, though I still think there is an artistic nerve in coming up with the base idea and concept. If you look at the work of the contemporary artist Jeff Koons, the fact is that he also does not create his own art. He has an enormous studio of people who do. But, all the art works are his vision. In this sense I don’t see any problem becoming the director instead of the creator.  However, the fact that the group reacted so much to this issue intrigued me, and I think this “problem” might actually become key point in my work.

Edward:

A city is a collaborative artwork in terms of its architecture, and each piece is designed (hopefully) with reference to its context.

Ben:

One thing that’s interesting is how process based the project is. we’ve kinda touched on aesthetics but where as everyone else’s project has been ‘by the end i want to achieve something that looks or feels like this’ here the conversation is more around different processes rather than the results of those. it’s really interesting.

Thank you again for this comment Ben, I think you really nailed it with this comment. I to have been worrying because I could not figure out what my end esult would be. And now I see the focus should be on the process.

Sneja:

but then the process has to be rewarding. How can this be done.

Good question! I think the best way to create an engaging experience is to start with your self: Would I want to participate in this?

Edward:

And perhaps the curator has a role in influencing the direction of future contributions.

Kiers:

Presumably each subset of groups responds differently to different rewards

Eduardo:

this is very true Sneja and we need to learn from the process

Sneja_d:

So maybe it should have an ‘educational’ side. I recently discovered the word ‘edutainement’ education+entertainment

Maybe?

Jonathan:

I think it is important to understand Shirky’s idea about Cognative Surplus, the idea that in the west from the 1950s onwards, populations took on a part time job of watching TV – but that now that is changing to creating rather than consuming – hence the cognitive surplus, lots of spare capacity for collaborative or social action/creating — there are others who disagree, or at least suggest that digital social connections are

Edward:

There’s also the reward of seeing your work in the context of a group project, e.g. to see your picture in a gallery alongside others invites comparison…

Well put Jonathan and Edward, that is precisely why I think the participation itself should be the reward.

Edward:

  But also affirmation that the work is worthy of inclusion. But if it is a “free for all” then this incentive is removed.

I have actually come across a lot of many social art that is open but people still want to be part of it, I guess if the end project seems like something you want to associate yourself with you will want to join even if it’s open to all.

Justin:

I’m trying to think how these works would be archive or displayed as well

Ben:

Justin – good point

Sneja_d:

and over what period of time?

Justin:

yeap

Sneja:

Shall it be limited in time or open?

I would prefer to keep it open and online, because this is in the nature of social media, but it might not be realistic to keep it open forever.

Jonathan:

This project connects some very current issues, like authorship, ownership, curating, incentives, professionalism, the myth of the individual artistic creator – exciting stuff!

​Yes, this is true. However only few online works deal with this issue. In the 3 dreams of black project I had to “agree to publish my work”, in other projects like Dear Photograph, I seems that contributors own their own part when it’s out of context but the works put in context are owned by the artist.

Eduardo:

And how people would access it

Justin:

who gets to see it vs who puts in some input

I guess that depends on the final work

Jonathan:

Oh yes and archiving – well that is a huge issue, very little ‘conservation’ work is being done with digital spaces :-(

Kiers:

Perhaps these early years of the Internet are like the early years of infant hood where nothing is remembered (conserved) until later on when the thought structures are more developed..

​Haha – if I use a social media platform like Facebook – it will probably be archived for ever (another scary thing about social media)

Suggestions:

Eduardo:

I think it would be great to create an app or website where people could choose an art work and modify to whatever they want, similar to what has already been done but. for example if a user chooses “The birth of Venus” , they could could create their own version and display on any social media platform, eg.. “The birth of Venus” by… and see what comments you’d get from it. Or maybe a timeline where it begins with an artwork, painting or video and people could add or modify things, to see what would be the end result of a co mass created piece.

Justin:

In terms of the form of the finished project, I think doing a few smaller ones would be a good place to start to assess the level of participation. I would imagine it would be hard to get strangers involved and to take on a big project

Sneja:

or many small projects composing one big ..

Eduardo:

using different social media

Justin:

yeah like chapters

Sneja:

a modular project where additional parts or levels could be added.

Ben:

this project would be really interesting to take to MA Curating at Chelsea!

- Thanks for the comments on how I should create my final work Ed, Sneja and Justin, I think it is really nice that you suggest that my final work could actually be several smaller projects that combine together.

Kiers:

could you also explore social instinct in animals and visualise the data – using treats on a bunch of guinea pigs in a maze.. or something..

Eduardo:

Id like to see how the work would progress when people are contributing to one piece

Edward:

I think it matters if they can (or cannot) see the rest of the contributed work.

I think this is true

Sneja:

access should be via mobile phones, which seems to be the most wide spread device

Interesting suggestion – I might just do that!

Links:

Ola:  It reminds me of a camping done by smart car, they did a twitter animation that serived as a tvc

Eduardo: http://scribblify.com/

Sneja: Man With A Movie Camera

Sneja:  SFZero, a Collaborative Production Game

Ola: http://www.arts.gov/research/new-media-report/index.html

Edward Kelly: An idea of curatorship, actually of work where the curatorial element is algorithmic rather than personally determined, hese are pictures organized by an artificial neural network:

 

Read More

I get so much spam on this blog even though I know for a fact that only a handful people read it. Actually I’ve only recieved one real comment – and almost a hundred spam comments. This really ticks me off: How do they find me? Why oh why this blog? WHAT is the point?

Spam comments actually killed a blog for me once – they drew me to stop moderating my comments, one day I accidently deleted all my real comments, and in the end I just stopped posting. I remember at one point I got so frustrated that I started sending emails back to some of email the adresses the comments were coming from. I know how stupid this sounds – I know they are automated robots and not real people, but this made me feel som much better.

To me, spam is one of the most anti-social things on social media. I would love to do a project where I highlight the spam on blogs in some way. Maybe upgrading them to post on a blog, maybe automating blog posts so they were similar to spam in some way … I don’t know, it doesn’t really fit into the direction I’ve been taking but it might be worth following for a short period.

These thoughts might be relevant for our digital sustainability project!

 

 

Read More